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VERNON WAYNE WOODY
US ARMY

Vernon Wayne Woody was born  February 12, 1947, and grew up as a farm boy in Princeton. He graduated from Princeton High School in 1967, and enrolled at East Texas State University. Wayne entered the Army in June of 1969, and after basic training, was trained as an Armor Reconnaissance Specialist, the job classification that would suffer more casualties than any other during the Vietnam War. . On November 15, 1969, he arrived in the Republic of Vietnam, and was assigned to H&H Co. 2nd Bn. 34th Armor, 25 the Infantry Division also known as the ‘Dreadnoughts.’ The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC, the Wall, contains 7,455 names of men who died non-hostile or accidental deaths. Military life is a dangerous way of life, in peacetime or in war. Cpl. Vernon Wayne Woody was a crewman on an armored attack vehicle. On January 30, 1970, he was killed when ran over by a large track vehicle. His wife Linda, gave birth to a daughter less than a month later. The name of Vernon W. Woody can be found on The Wall at Panel 14W, row 82.

Medals Awarded:
VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL
VIETNAM CAMPAIGN RIBBON
NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL
GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL

(click on pictures for large view)

Just graduated from Basic Training Linda and Wayne, home for the last time. In Vietnam Ridgeview Memorial in McKinney
 
 
Ronnie - I just read your chapter on Charles Bryan.  I don't know if you will remember me - my maiden name was CINDY COX and I graduated from MHS in 1968.  Anyway - just a side note for you.  In my Senior year, I was "dating" Austin Hill (Class of 1965) who was in Viet Nam (Saigon) in 1967/68.  One day, somebody from the office came to my classroom and said I should go to the office.  Mr Faubion proceeded to tell me that the Red Cross had just sent word that Austin Hill had been killed in Viet Nam.  Mr. Faubion called me to the office because Austin had a sister, Linda Hill Woody, who was my age and Mr. Faubion wanted me to be in the office when they told her the news.  So, they got Linda out of class and told her Austin had been killed.  Her parents lived in the last house on Anthony Street - no electricity, etc. - very poor living conditions.  Austin was the oldest of 10 children, I think.  Anyway, for two days, we all thought Austin was dead,  HOWEVER, we found out after two days, that it was a tragic mistake from the Red Cross, and in fact, the death was Linda's husband, Wayne Woody, who had actually worked for my dad, Ralph Cox, at Blackland Distributing Company on South Tennessee, when he got drafted.  It was a very weird and terrible time!

If you would like to leave a memorial message in the memory of Wayne Woody, Go Here.

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